Posts from the ‘How to’ Category

How to unclog a toilet


How to test for a leaky toilet

It’s a helpless feeling when it happens. You flush the toilet and instead of going down, the water starts rising. You watch as the water, toilet paper and anything else that happens to be in the toilet slowly inches its way to the rim of the bowl. Your heart races, you palms get sweaty, and a hopeless feeling of panic sets in as you brace for the flood. Clogged toilets are a nightmare to deal with but if you know what you’re doing you can help avert a disaster.

Determine if your toilet is really plugged:

There are occasions when you toilet seems like it’s plugged when in fact it really isn’t. In order for a toilet to flush properly it needs to have a certain amount of water rush into the bowl at a certain speed. If there isn’t enough water, or if it doesn’t enter the bowl fast enough, the toilet won’t have the suction it needs to create a proper flush.  Over time the ports that are at the top rim of the toilet bowl can become choked off by calcium and lime deposits from your water. When these ports get plugged the toilet does not get the rush of water that it needs.

lime scale calcium build up toilet bowl flush de-limer de-scaler mineral deposit calcified calcium calcified limed plugged clogged unplug unclog cleaner

Santeen Toilet Bowl Cleaner

To take care of the problem you need to get yourself a good de-limer. The best one the we have fond is a product called Santeen Toilet Bowl Cleaner. Our plumbers dry off the rim of the toilet and then duct tape over the ports. This keeps thesanteen from jut pouring through the ports and lets it really work its magic. Pour the de-limer into the overflow tube located in the toilet tank (it has the flapper attached to it). Let the Santeen eat away at the lime build up for about 15 minutes. Take the tape off of the ports. Be careful not to get the Santeen on your hands (gloves are recommended , it’s nasty stuff). Pour more Santeen into the overflow to flush anything more out of the toilet. You should see all kinds of nastiness come out. Try flushing the toilet again, you should see marked improvement.

If you’re worried about an overflow you should shut-off the supply of water to the toilet. The shut-off  is found on the left down behind the toilet. Turn it until it stops the flow of water.

power plunger toilet clog plug removal unplug unclog clean out plumbing plumber flush how to

The “Power Plunger” by Harvey

Next you need to get a plunger. Use a plunger that has a pull out that will make a good seal in the bottom of the bowl. A good one  that you can use is the Harvey power plunger. Plungers that do not have the pull out option will not make a great seal and therefore will not have the push that the power plunger has.  A plunger is used to force whatever is blocked in the toilet through.

If you cannot get the block taken care of by pushing it trough you may need to use something that pulls the blockage out. To do this you ill need a toilet auger (also called a toilet snake).  A toilet auger is used to grind through and/or grab a blockage. Be careful when inserting the toilet auger into the toilet bowl not to scratch t bowl with the spring on the auger. Marks left by the auger will be very difficult to remove. Slide the auger down into the bend at the bottom of the bowl. Extend the cable out into the toilet until you hit a blockage. Gently turn the handle and grind or grab the blockage and pull it back out. Be careful if you find resistance don’t force it. If the spring binds and then releases violently you could potentially crack he porcelain of the toilet from the inside. After removing the blockage turn the water back on and attempt to flush again.

Toilet auger snake plug clog unclog unplug clean out repair plumber plumbing

How to auger out a toilet

Along Came Polly toilet scene – YouTube.

If you have any questions, comments, or if you want to schedule a plumber contact us at 763-551-8990

LeVahn Brothers Plumbing and Hardware is located at 12700 Bass Lake Rd Maple Grove, MN 55369

Find us on the web at www.levahnbos.com and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/levahnbrothers

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Minnesota is a hotbed for radioactive gas radon | StarTribune.com


  • Minnesota is a hotbed for radioactive gas radon | StarTribune.com.
  • Here’s a news story from Star Tribune about how prevalent Radon Gas is in Minnesota. It’s incredibly easy to test your home yourself to find out if you have a problem with radon. I tested my home last year with a First Alert test kit that I got from our hardware store. The test kit includes instructions that were very easy to follow. I placed my tester out in a specific spot based off of the instructions and sealed it up 24 hours later. I received my test results after 2 1/2 weeks that indicated that I had low levels of Radon present.

    Gas Leak detector Radon Test kit First Alert Easy radon test Cheap economical hardware store mail in EPA listed Lab test included

    First Alert Radon Test Kit Available from LeVahn Brothers Plumbing and Hardware

My levels were low enough that I didn’t need to do anything. It gave me peace of mind to know that I wasn’t poisoning my kids, wife or myself with radon in my home. I highly recommend getting a test or having your home professionally tested if you have serious worries and want more immediate results.

If you are wondering if the neighborhood that you live in is a hot bed for radon the Star Tribune has a page that allows you to enter your zip code and it will let you know how many cases of radon have been reported in that area.  It will also tell you how that compares to the national average. According to the Star Tribune Minnesota has some of the highest radon concentrations in the country. I entered the Zip code of where the hardware store is located and it indicated that in Maple Grove 55369 just over 34% of the homes tested had unsafe levels of radon present. In Maple Grove 55311 27% of homes tested had unsafe levels. Plymouth Zip code 55442 also was above 27%.  Plymouth 55441 had over 41% of homes tested above unsafe levels of radon.  Here’s the link to that web page if you want to check out your neighborhood:

http://www.startribune.com/local/190270511.html

 

A winter survival guide for your house | StarTribune.com


Photo: Tom Wallace, Star Tribune

Star Tribune photo galleries

Chimney

• Have it inspected by a professional chimney inspector every year.

• Have it cleaned every year or two, or more if you have a lot of fires or tend to burn softer woods.

• A chimney cap with a rain hood and screen will minimize rain damage and keep critters out.

Fireplace

• Stock up on clean, dry firewood. A fireplace store can recommend someone to deliver and stack it for you. Store it away from your house to keep mice and other vermin at a distance.

• Close the damper when the fireplace is not in use. When you’re using it, turn down the thermostat and open a window near the fireplace to prevent warm air from being pulled from other parts of the house.

• Install glass doors on the fireplace to keep warm air from being drawn up the chimney.

• If you use the fireplace frequently, a fireplace insert improves efficiency by blowing heat into the room and limiting heat loss up the chimney.

Keep the cold out and the heat in

• Reducing air leaks and properly insulating walls, crawl spaces and floors can cut energy bills by up to 10 percent. Seal leaky ducts with metal-backed tape or aerosol sealant. Consider having your insulation updated to save money, improve comfort and lower the risk of ice dams.

• Set your thermostat between 65 and 70 degrees when you’re home; lower it when you’re sleeping or away from home for more than a few hours. Use a programmable thermostat to make the switches automatic.

• On sunny days, open curtains and blinds to let the sun’s heat in. Close them at night to trap the warmth inside.

• Close or install storm windows, which reduce drafts and frost formation and can cut heat loss through the window by 25 to 50 percent. For a cheaper alternative, cover windows with plastic.

• Schedule a home energy audit through Xcel Energy; for $30 to $100 a professional will inspect your home and identify ways you can save on energy, including windows, insulation, and heating and cooling systems.

Keep rooms toasty

• Run your ceiling fan at low speed in reverse direction (counter-clockwise) so the blades drive warm air down into the room.

Heating

• Change your furnace filters per the manufacturer recommendations. Most homes are built with a 1-inch filter which should be refreshed every month.

• Clean your furnace before the first cold spell. If your furnace isn’t too dirty, you can save money by vacuuming the blades yourself.

• Get acquainted with your

house’s ductwork. Most homes are equipped with dampers, allowing you to change the volume of heat delivered upstairs, downstairs and all rooms in-between.

Plumbing

• Disconnect your garden hose, shut off the water valve and drain the spigot — even if you have a frost-free faucet.

• Drain the sediment from your water heater. This should be done once or twice every year.

Pests

• Repair any exterior damage that might invite pests. Carpenter ants like leaky pipes, warped storm windows and tattered roof shingles, whereas frayed screens and chewed-through door sweeps attract rodents.

• Clear your garage of mice-magnets, especially if you have an attached garage. This isn’t the place to stash woodpiles and unsealed birdseed.

Spring

• Prevent a flooded basement by caulking any gaps in your sidewalks, especially those closest to the house.

Gutters

• Clean debris from gutters and downspouts. Open any roof drains or vents.

Roof

• Check the caulking around vents and chimneys and other roof protrusions to make sure the seal is tight.

• If you tend to have problems with snow and ice backup, consider installing electrical heat tapes to keep melted snow flowing off of the roof.

• If you use an ice rake to remove snow from your roof to avoid ice dams, make sure you rake all the way to the roof’s peak, or dams could form above the rake line.

Sources: Crystal Manik, senior marketing business consultant for Xcel Energy; Eric Siedow, technician for Chimney Guys; Rodney Pierce, salesperson for Genz-Ryan Plumbing, Heating and Air Conditioning; Colleen Cannon, staff entomologist for Plunkett’s Pest Control; Bill Yares, president of Twin Cities Home Evaluations; Stacy Reese, manager of Walker Roofing.

via A winter survival guide for your house | StarTribune.com.

Additional related articles:

How to prepare your home for colder temperatures

How to prevent an outside faucet from freezing

Get a roof rake to prevent ice dams

What to do for a frozen sump pump discharge line

Save money by insulating your home

It’s prime lawn care time | StarTribune.com


It’s the perfect time to attend to your lawn.

As garden chores wind down, you can turn your attention to improving your grass — now and next spring.

Star Tribune photo galleries

Early fall is a time of active growth for grass, both above and below ground. That means regardless of the current condition of your grass, it’s prime time for lawn care. Any effort you put into your yard now will pay dividends not only this fall, but also next spring and summer.

Here’s how to keep your lawn looking great:

FERTILIZE

fall fertilizer

Because turf grasses are growing so actively now, they’re able to take up and make use of fertilizer most effectively.

Apply a high-nitrogen fertilizer in early to mid-September, then water the lawn lightly afterward to make sure the granules reach the soil and don’t wash away. (Nitrogen is always the first of three numbers that give the nutrient analysis of any fertilizer.)

The University of Minnesota no longer recommends a second application later in autumn, because grass is less able to absorb nitrogen then. One fall application will do.

WATER

Though we often receive plenty of rainfall in autumn, it’s not unusual to run into a dry spell.

If we haven’t had rain for a week or so, you should water the lawn, especially if it’s been warm or windy. It best to water deeply, rather than lightly, but how often you need to water depends on the weather. As the temperatures drop, you can water less frequently, but as long as grass continues to grow it will need water — whether from the sky or your sprinkler.

MOW

Keeping the grass taller during summer (2 1/2 to 3 inches) results in deeper root growth. But once the weather cools off, you can gradually reduce the height of the grass. By the final mowing, your lawnmower blades should be set so the grass is only about 2 inches tall. If the grass blades are left too tall going into winter, they can pack down, which makes the grass more prone to disease.

SEED

Scotts ez Seed shaker

 

Early September is the best time to overseed thin patches of grass. Soils are still warm, there’s usually more rainfall, and nights are longer and cooler — all favorable conditions for grass seed to germinate and grow rapidly. Plus, few weed seeds are programmed to sprout now, so there’s less competition.

Scruff the soil so seeds make good contact rather than sit on a hard-packed surface. Aerifying the lawn before overseeding loosens the soil and creates an excellent surface for planting. Fertilize with standard lawn fertilizer or one formulated specifically for use when planting grass seed. Then water lightly as often as needed to keep the soil moist. Water more heavily and less frequently as the young grasses grow. Mow the areas that are overseeded when existing grasses grow too tall. Most important, do not use any form of herbicide in these areas until next year, including fertilizer/herbicide combinations.

WEEDS CRABGRASS

An abundance of crabgrass has been one of this year’s most common complaints. The repeated heavy spring rains interfered with pre-emergence herbicides. So even lawns that were treated for crabgrass may have lots of it.

Because crabgrass is an annual weed that dies over the winter, there’s no point in using weed killers on it now. Instead, plan to apply a pre-emergence herbicide to infested areas next spring.

Natural products containing corn gluten meal also prevent crabgrass, but they take several years of spring and late-summer applications to be the most effective.

PERENNIAL WEEDS

 

Creeping Charlie Herbicide

Ortho herbicide for creeping charlie

By the latter part of September, temperatures will have cooled enough to begin using broad-leaf herbicides on dandelions, plantain, creeping Charlie and other perennial weeds, which spring back from the same roots year after year.Because perennial weeds are storing nutrients in their roots now for next year’s growth, they’ll take in herbicide more readily in the fall. On really tough weeds such as creeping Charlie, you can add a second herbicide application two weeks after the first.

If you prefer not to use herbicides, manually dig out perennial weeds. And remember, the weeds you remove this fall won’t be around to produce seeds next year.

AERATE AND DETHATCH

If your soil is hard or you have a thick buildup of thatch (more than 1/2 inch), your lawn will benefit from core aeration in September. Aeration takes small plugs out of the soil, which allows water, fertilizer and oxygen to penetrate below the surface and encourages good grass growth. (The small cores of soil should be left on the surface of the grass, so they break down and top-dress the soil.) You can rent an aeration machine (it’s hard work) or hire the job out.

Power rake

If the thatch is really thick, rent a dethatching machine, also known as a “vertical mower.” (Again, this is hard work you may wish to hire out.) The machine slices through the grass, bringing up lots of thatch, which will have to be raked up and added to your compost pile.

Aerating and dethatching may be done on the same day, but they will dry the soil rapidly, so be sure to water the lawn once you’re done.

Deb Brown is a garden writer and former extension horticulturist with the University of Minnesota.

via It’s prime lawn care time | StarTribune.com.

Other posts that you may enjoy:

 https://levahnbros.wordpress.com/2009/10/02/fall-yard-care/

https://levahnbros.wordpress.com/2009/05/08/grass-seed/

https://levahnbros.wordpress.com/2009/04/14/spring-lawn-care-thatch-aeration-and-fertilizers/

Lawn dethatching | Lawn gardening | Home lawn care: Gardening.

https://levahnbros.wordpress.com/2012/08/31/lawn-dethatching-lawn-gardening-home-lawn-care-gardening/

https://levahnbros.wordpress.com/2012/09/01/when-should-you-dethatch-or-aerate-your-lawn/

LeVahn Brothers Hardware is located at 12700 Bass Lake Rd. Maple Grove, MN 55369

Find us online at levahnbros.com and also on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/levahnbrothers

You can aslo call us at 763-553-1222

 

How to Repair a Leaking Toilet?


Plumbing and Hardware Maple Grove, MN

Have you ever been brushing your teeth at night and suddenly you hear the toilet refill on its own. It’s what we here at LeVahn Bros. Plumbing like to call a “ghost flush”. A ghost flush occurs when the water that is in the tank leaks out and the tank refills itself .  A toilet is a simple mechanical device that can be explained as follows. The toilet bowl is the area that waste is deposited (i.e. the business end of the toilet that we are all to familiar with). The tank is on the back of the toilet and it’s job is to hold water that is going to be used to “flush” out the contents of the bowl. This is the behind the scenes workings of a toilet that confuse the bejesus out of us. When we flush a toilet we push down on the flush handle which lifts the flapper up allowing the water to enter the bowl and expel its contents. The same flush could be done with a bucket of water but that’s  a bit of a pain to have to refill each time. When the water level in the tank goes down, the fill valve turns on to bring the water back up to a preset level.

Toilet Tank

When a “ghost flush” occurs it is because water is leaving the tank. After a while the water level lowers in the tank until it reaches the point when the fill valve turns on to bring the water level back up. There’s only two places for the water to go when it leaves a tank. The first place it could go is that it’s leaking out of the toilet itself. If this is occurring you would probably see evidence of water on the floor or on the base of the toilet. The most likely causes of this are: 1) you have a crack in your tank. 2) you have water leaking out through the holes where the tank bolts are. 3) your tank to bowl gasket is leaking. If your tank is cracked we would recommend that you buy a new toilet. You could also attempt to seal it with a two-part epoxy that can be applied when the surface is wet. If you have a leak occurring through the tank to bowl bolts you will need to replace the washers under the bolts. To do this you will first need to shut the water off to the toilet. Then you will drain the tank by flushing the toilet and sponging out any remaining water. Finally remove and replace the old washers with new washers that you have already purchased from your local hardware store:) If your tank to bowl gasket is leaking you will need to un-bolt the tank from the bowl and remove the old gasket. Bring the gasket as well as any make and model info you have for your toilet to the hardware store and get a replacement.

note: There is no such thing as a “universal” tank to bowl gasket so you need to make sure you get something that matches the one you removed from your toilet.

The other, more common, reason for water leaving the tank is through a faulty flapper. Normally you can not see or hear the water leaking out past the flapper. It leaks so slowly that it’s hardly detectable be sight or sound. There is a simple solution that is very effective to figure out if this is your problem. At our store we have free leak detectors that you add to the tank of the toilet.

Leaky Toilet Test

All you have to do is open up the leak detector, place it in the tank and let it work its magic. Essentially all it does it turn the water in the tank blue. What this does is  it allows you to see if water is getting past the flapper without you flushing the toilet. If you leave the toilet alone WITHOUT FLUSHING IT and after a few hours there is blue water in the bowl, you know that water is leaking past your flapper. It will look something like the picture below.

Leaky Toilet Test

Once you find out that your flapper is the problem shut the water off to the toilet flush it and remove the old flapper. Bring the flapper with you when you go to buy a new one because like toilet tank gaskets there is no such thing as a universal flapper. We must have 20 to 30 flapper styles here at our store and there are still some other unique ones out there that we don’t carry.  There are many different styles, especially since the addition of low flow toilet to the market. Here’s an image of the most common one we sell. We’ve changed over to using blue vinyl flappers when available because we’ve found that they seem to outlast the traditional black rubber models.

Toilet Flapper

There are a few reasons why a flapper goes bad. One reason is that it’s just old. The rubber doesn’t last forever and eventually it gets water-logged and broken down. The other major reason for a flapper failing is from the use of chlorine tablets in the toilet tank. Chlorine tablets are an effective way to keep your bowl looking it’s best but they eat the rubber seals in a toilet away in no time. The flapper, tank to bowl washers, and fill valve seals all get eaten away by the chlorine. If you want a very effective alternative you can use Fluidmasters  “Flush and Sparkle” bleach cartridges. We use them here in the restrooms here at our store and they do a great job of keeping the toilet clean without introducing bleach into the toilet tank (You can see the cartridge attached to the back of the toilet tank in the picture at the top of this post).

Fluidmaster Flush and Sparkle Bleach Cartridge

If you can’t find your exact flapper there may be a models that’s close enough. You may also want to clean the edge where the flapper is seating against the tank to make sure there is no debris holding up the flapper allowing water to get past. The use of a non-scratch scouring pad is advised for doing this. Whatever you do make sure you talk to someone who knows what they’re doing at the store you go in to. Nothing drives me crazier and makes me more thankful for my employees then when people tell me how incompetent the help is at the big box stores.  If that’s your only option I say, good luck to you.

Additional blogs you may be interested in-What to do for a leaky toilet, What to do for a leaky water heater, How to repair a copper pipe leak, How to repair a dripping faucet

For more Information call 763-551-8990

Stop in and see us in the Bass Lake shopping center at 12700 Bass Lake Road, Maple Grove, MN 55369

Visit us on the web at levahnbros.com and at http://www.facebook.com/levahnbrothers

For ordering appliance, electronics, lawn equipment and other parts visit https://www.partscription.com/?unitedhdwe=005938

How to prepare you home for colder temperatures


Frost covered leaves

There is cold weather coming and there’s no way of stopping it. In fact we’ve already  hit lows in the 30’s and its only the middle of September. You can curse and grumble all you want but the reality is summer has come and gone. Now is the time to start getting your home ready to take on the cold Minnesota winter. Here are  a few easy tips to help combat the effects of winter on your home.

1) Drain your outside faucet

When the temps are consistently reaching the freezing mark at night you need to drain your outside faucet line. Doing this prevents your water line that supplies your outside faucet from freezing and bursting during the cold winter months. Most outside faucets should have a shut-off valve inside on the water supply line. It will look something like the valve pictured below. Start by getting a bucket to catch the water. Shut the valve off supplying the water to the outside faucet. Next go and open up the outside spigot to prevent an airlock in the line. Then go inside and unscrew the small brass drain cap located on the side of the valve being very careful not to lose the cap. When it’s done draining PUT THE CAP BACK ON. If you lose the cap you are going to be kicking yourself when spring arrives. You can purchase new caps for most valves but not every manufacturer makes the same. For more info check out these other blogs: How to prevent an outside faucet from freezing, What’s the deal with backflow preventors for outside faucets and What to do for frozen pipes

Brass ball valve with drain

2) Make sure all gaps and cracks are filled around your home

You should go around your home and do a visual check of your window and door casements, and your foundation to make sure there are no cracks for cold or uninvited guests to get in. Use an all-weather window and door caulking. I like to use a caulk that’s 100% silicone like GE Silicone II supreme. It stays flexible and is rain ready in about 1 hours time. You should also patch any cracks and holes in your foundation to prevent critters from entering your home as well as preventing heat loss. Unwanted guests of all kinds including insects and mice are going to be looking for somewhere warm to spend the winter. Don’t let it be your home. For more info on getting rid of unwanted guests check out these blogs: How to get rid of mice, how to get rid of ants in and around your home

Seal all cracks in windows doors and foundations

3) Replace weather seals around windows and doors

Check the seals around your windows and doors to make sure the weather-stripping is still in good shape. Caulking the casement helps but you also need to make sure the seals on the windows/doors are doing what they’re supposed to. It gets a little more difficult when replacing the seals on windows and doors because every manufacturer has their own specific seal that fits only their product. You can use a generic adhesive backed foam in place of what was there but if want the best seal you need to go back to the manufacturer. For more info on insulating your home check out this blog: How to save money by insulating your home

adhesive backed foam tape

4)Prevent frozen sump pump lines and damage from ice dams.

Take advantage of the still bearable weather to install heat tape to your sump pump line and to your roof and gutters. We all know about the remarkable amount of snow we received last year. People all over the U.S. were dealing with ice dams and the Twin cities area was no exception. Now is the time to install roof de-icing cables, before there’s snow and ice present. If you had problems with ice dams last year you should purchase and install cables on your roof or at least in the gutters to keep the water flowing off your roof instead of in your home. 

If you have a sump pump that is constantly running even through the cold winter months they’re aren’t a lot of options that meet code. One non-code option is to run the line into a floor drain or work sink. Remember this is not an option that is code. In order to solve the issue and still be up to code you need to find a way of keeping your line from freezing. Try using a water proof heat cable inside the sump line to keep the water flowing.

For more info on roof dams and frozen sump lines check out these blogs: Roof de-icing tablets, Roof de-icing cables, Get a roof rake to prevent an ice dam, how to prevent an ice dam on your roof, what to do for a frozen sump pump discharge line,

 For more information on what to do for your house before the

snow flies call us at 763-553-1222

Stop in and see us at 12700 Bass Lake Rd. Maple Grove MN 55369

Visit us on the web at levahnbros.com and on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/levahnbrothers

How to get rid of mosquitoes in your yard


Blood filled mosquito

Mosquitoes in Minnesota are notoriously bad. In fact it’s often joked that mosquitoes are the real official state bird. With that said this year has been one of the worst for mosquitoes that I can remember. It’s gotten so bad that it was keeping me inside. That’s right, even though we have only 6 months of weather without snow to enjoy the outdoors I would rather have sat inside then get eaten alive.

Here was my problem. My little girl was turning 3 and we planned a birthday party for her at the house. We invited 36 friends and family members 18 of them being children under the age of 12. We needed to be able to go outside for our own sanity. In preparation for the party my wife went outside to do some weeding. Even though it was about 85 degrees out she wore long sleeves and pants and covered herself in bug spray. It didn’t help. She could only handle it for 10 minutes and she was done. I watched as she constantly waved her hand in front of her face to shoo away the swarm of mosquitoes around her.

Mosquito Beater Hose End Sprayer

I had never tried it before but we sell a product that is called Mosquito Beater by Bonide. It comes in a few different forms including a granule shaker and a hose end sprayer. A few hours before the party we applied the spray version to the yard and garden around the house itself. Right as the party was starting we decided to apply the granules to the areas we didn’t spray down near the lake that we live on. In both instances the mosquitoes were relentlessly attacking us as we applied the Mosquito Beater. But I can honestly say that I didn’t see a single mosquito during the party. In fact, I had completely forgotten about it until my dad mentioned how well the Mosquito Beater was working.

Mosquito Beater Granule Shaker

I highly recommend using this product in your yard if you have a mosquito issue. It is a residual insecticide so it will continue to work for a number of weeks after you apply it. Using this product made it possible for me to go back outside and enjoy the few remaining weeks of decent weather that we have left.

If you would like more information contact us at 763-553-1222

Stop in and see us at 12700 Bass Lake Rd. Maple Grove, MN 55369

Visit us on the web at levahnbros.com

For more tips about getting rid of mosquitoes and other pests check out these blogs: How to get rid of 1-5,000 mosquitoes a night using a bat house, how to get rid of wasps hornets and yellow jackets, How to get rid of Box elder Bugs

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