Posts tagged ‘Maple Grove’

Local Business Owners Talk Shop in Maple Grove | Donato’s Floral, LeVahn Bros. Plumbing, Juniper Clothing | Maple Grove Magazine


LeVahn Brothers Plumbing Donato's Floral and Juniper clothing Talking Shop

We all shop in Maple Grove, but what is it like on the other side of the counter? We talked with three Maple Grove business owners who, as it turns out, hold similar views on what it means to be entrepreneurial and to serve our community.

Local Business Owners Talk Shop in Maple Grove | Donato’s Floral | Maple Grove Magazine.

Business Matters: Maple Grove company celebrates 90 years


The Original LeVahn Brothers Plumbers

The original LeVahn Brothers Oscar, Ed, and my Great Grandfather Art

LeVahn Bros. Plumbing and Hardware is a fixture in Maple Grove today. But you have to go back to 1923, when Warren G. Harding was president, to discover the origins of this local company that’s celebrating 90 years in business in February.

At their retail shop in Maple Grove, LeVahn Bros. is the kind of place where you come to get answers. A fourth-generation family owned business, the hardware store has an old-school feel with aisles of tools and parts and employees that can answer questions about that doodad that you need to fix a leak or to install something.

“We try to stress the service and the expertise that we’ve got,” said store manager Andy LeVahn. “People keep coming back because they know they can come in and get something and get out quickly and get the right thing the first time.”

Andy LeVahn is the fourth generation of LeVahn’s to run the business, but it was his great–grandfather, Art, and his two brothers who started LeVahn Bros. Plumbing in North Minneapolis back in 1923.

At the Maple Grove store, old black and white photographs adorn a wall depicting the early days of the business. Back then plumbers used a horse and buggy and later a Model T Ford to answer service calls, and a receipt from 1923 shows outfitting an entire house in Minneapolis with plumbing cost $68.14.

A Plumbing bill from 1923 or $68.23

A LeVahn Brothers Plumbing bill from 1923

Today, the prices and the modes of transportation have changed, but LeVahn Bros is still a plumbing business. Andy’s father, Loren LeVahn, the current business owner, added a hardware store to the business in 1994. The retail business brought the company to Maple Grove, and the plumbing/hardware store pairing has helped sustain the business.

“When the hardware store gets slow, the business in the plumbing seems to be a little bit better, so they can help each other out that way,” said Andy LeVahn.

It’s customers like Dennis Peterson of Maple Grove that help explain the company’s true longevity though. Peterson is one of many loyal customers who frequent the shop on a regular basis.

“I’m sure I come in here at least once a month for something,” said Peterson. “Some things I really need some help on, I come here cause they can help you more than the big stores can.”

LeVahn Brothers Plumbings retail Hardware Hank Store

Our retail Hardware Hank store located In the Bass Lake Shopping Center

The roots of good customer service go back 90 years for LeVahn Bros., and the younger generation believes that’s just as relevant today as in 1923.

“My great-grandfather started it in Minneapolis. They always try to put the customer first, and that’s what we try to do also,” said Andy LeVahn.

Alexandra Renslo reporting
arenslo@twelve.tv

Here’s a link to the video  from Channel 12 TV: Business Matters: Maple Grove company celebrates 90 years.

LeVahn Brothers Plumbing and Hardware is located at 12700  Bass Lake Rd in Maple Grove, MN 55369

Find us on the web at www.levahnbros.com or on Facebook at www.facebook.com/levahnbrothers 

Fall lawn care practices may be different this year : Extension news : University of Minnesota Extension


Here is an article from the University of Minnesota Extension about our drought conditions in Minnesota and what to do about your lawn and garden this fall.

Fall lawn care practices may be different this year

Media Contact: Catherine Dehdashti, University of Minnesota Extension, office 612-625-0237, cell 651-329-2427,ced@umn.edu

ST. PAUL, Minn. (9/18/2012) —Fall is the preferred time for many important lawn care practices. From fertilization and weed control, to aeration and seeding, there is no better time for cool-season turfgrass maintenance in the Midwest. But this year is different, according to University of Minnesota Extension turfgrass educator Sam Bauer.

“The lack of precipitation in August has caused many of our Kentucky bluegrass, perennial ryegrass, or fine fescue lawns to turn brown and cease growing,” said Bauer. “In order for your lawn to recover, you will need to begin irrigating regularly.” This means more than just one or two cycles, but enough water to wet the root zone sufficiently to sustain turfgrass health.

If your lawn is stressed from lack of moisture, typical fall maintenance practices that have been recommended in the past may add additional stress. “Concentrate more this fall on creating the best possible growing environment for your turfgrass, and you will reap the benefits during next year’s growing season,” said Bauer.

Here are some tips from Bauer for drought-stressed lawns:

  • Aerate after the lawn’s health has been restored. While aeration is a great fall practice, it further stresses drought-stressed turf and may actually cause the lawn quality to decline.
  • Don’t dethatch or use a vertical mower. This process tears turfgrass leaves and crowns, and should only be conducted when the lawn is healthy.
  • Don’t spray herbicides on a brown lawn. Systemic and contact herbicides used for weed control are more effective when weeds are actively growing.
  • Choose fertilizer sources with at least half of the nitrogen component present in the slow release form. High rates of quick release nitrogen fertilizers can have negative effects on drought-stressed turf. There is also a greater potential for environmental loss of nitrogen when the lawn is not actively growing.
  • Raise the mowing height and mow less frequently to encourage turfgrass recovery.
  • Maintain soil moisture to promote turfgrass recovery.
  • Spot seed and fertilize thin, weak areas with a high-quality turfgrass seed mixture.
  • Perform a soil test to determine fertilizer requirements of phosphorus and potassium.

For more information on lawn care, visit www.extension.umn.edu/turfgrass

Fall lawn care practices may be different this year : Extension news : University of Minnesota Extension.

A winter survival guide for your house | StarTribune.com


Photo: Tom Wallace, Star Tribune

Star Tribune photo galleries

Chimney

• Have it inspected by a professional chimney inspector every year.

• Have it cleaned every year or two, or more if you have a lot of fires or tend to burn softer woods.

• A chimney cap with a rain hood and screen will minimize rain damage and keep critters out.

Fireplace

• Stock up on clean, dry firewood. A fireplace store can recommend someone to deliver and stack it for you. Store it away from your house to keep mice and other vermin at a distance.

• Close the damper when the fireplace is not in use. When you’re using it, turn down the thermostat and open a window near the fireplace to prevent warm air from being pulled from other parts of the house.

• Install glass doors on the fireplace to keep warm air from being drawn up the chimney.

• If you use the fireplace frequently, a fireplace insert improves efficiency by blowing heat into the room and limiting heat loss up the chimney.

Keep the cold out and the heat in

• Reducing air leaks and properly insulating walls, crawl spaces and floors can cut energy bills by up to 10 percent. Seal leaky ducts with metal-backed tape or aerosol sealant. Consider having your insulation updated to save money, improve comfort and lower the risk of ice dams.

• Set your thermostat between 65 and 70 degrees when you’re home; lower it when you’re sleeping or away from home for more than a few hours. Use a programmable thermostat to make the switches automatic.

• On sunny days, open curtains and blinds to let the sun’s heat in. Close them at night to trap the warmth inside.

• Close or install storm windows, which reduce drafts and frost formation and can cut heat loss through the window by 25 to 50 percent. For a cheaper alternative, cover windows with plastic.

• Schedule a home energy audit through Xcel Energy; for $30 to $100 a professional will inspect your home and identify ways you can save on energy, including windows, insulation, and heating and cooling systems.

Keep rooms toasty

• Run your ceiling fan at low speed in reverse direction (counter-clockwise) so the blades drive warm air down into the room.

Heating

• Change your furnace filters per the manufacturer recommendations. Most homes are built with a 1-inch filter which should be refreshed every month.

• Clean your furnace before the first cold spell. If your furnace isn’t too dirty, you can save money by vacuuming the blades yourself.

• Get acquainted with your

house’s ductwork. Most homes are equipped with dampers, allowing you to change the volume of heat delivered upstairs, downstairs and all rooms in-between.

Plumbing

• Disconnect your garden hose, shut off the water valve and drain the spigot — even if you have a frost-free faucet.

• Drain the sediment from your water heater. This should be done once or twice every year.

Pests

• Repair any exterior damage that might invite pests. Carpenter ants like leaky pipes, warped storm windows and tattered roof shingles, whereas frayed screens and chewed-through door sweeps attract rodents.

• Clear your garage of mice-magnets, especially if you have an attached garage. This isn’t the place to stash woodpiles and unsealed birdseed.

Spring

• Prevent a flooded basement by caulking any gaps in your sidewalks, especially those closest to the house.

Gutters

• Clean debris from gutters and downspouts. Open any roof drains or vents.

Roof

• Check the caulking around vents and chimneys and other roof protrusions to make sure the seal is tight.

• If you tend to have problems with snow and ice backup, consider installing electrical heat tapes to keep melted snow flowing off of the roof.

• If you use an ice rake to remove snow from your roof to avoid ice dams, make sure you rake all the way to the roof’s peak, or dams could form above the rake line.

Sources: Crystal Manik, senior marketing business consultant for Xcel Energy; Eric Siedow, technician for Chimney Guys; Rodney Pierce, salesperson for Genz-Ryan Plumbing, Heating and Air Conditioning; Colleen Cannon, staff entomologist for Plunkett’s Pest Control; Bill Yares, president of Twin Cities Home Evaluations; Stacy Reese, manager of Walker Roofing.

via A winter survival guide for your house | StarTribune.com.

Additional related articles:

How to prepare your home for colder temperatures

How to prevent an outside faucet from freezing

Get a roof rake to prevent ice dams

What to do for a frozen sump pump discharge line

Save money by insulating your home

It’s prime lawn care time | StarTribune.com


It’s the perfect time to attend to your lawn.

As garden chores wind down, you can turn your attention to improving your grass — now and next spring.

Star Tribune photo galleries

Early fall is a time of active growth for grass, both above and below ground. That means regardless of the current condition of your grass, it’s prime time for lawn care. Any effort you put into your yard now will pay dividends not only this fall, but also next spring and summer.

Here’s how to keep your lawn looking great:

FERTILIZE

fall fertilizer

Because turf grasses are growing so actively now, they’re able to take up and make use of fertilizer most effectively.

Apply a high-nitrogen fertilizer in early to mid-September, then water the lawn lightly afterward to make sure the granules reach the soil and don’t wash away. (Nitrogen is always the first of three numbers that give the nutrient analysis of any fertilizer.)

The University of Minnesota no longer recommends a second application later in autumn, because grass is less able to absorb nitrogen then. One fall application will do.

WATER

Though we often receive plenty of rainfall in autumn, it’s not unusual to run into a dry spell.

If we haven’t had rain for a week or so, you should water the lawn, especially if it’s been warm or windy. It best to water deeply, rather than lightly, but how often you need to water depends on the weather. As the temperatures drop, you can water less frequently, but as long as grass continues to grow it will need water — whether from the sky or your sprinkler.

MOW

Keeping the grass taller during summer (2 1/2 to 3 inches) results in deeper root growth. But once the weather cools off, you can gradually reduce the height of the grass. By the final mowing, your lawnmower blades should be set so the grass is only about 2 inches tall. If the grass blades are left too tall going into winter, they can pack down, which makes the grass more prone to disease.

SEED

Scotts ez Seed shaker

 

Early September is the best time to overseed thin patches of grass. Soils are still warm, there’s usually more rainfall, and nights are longer and cooler — all favorable conditions for grass seed to germinate and grow rapidly. Plus, few weed seeds are programmed to sprout now, so there’s less competition.

Scruff the soil so seeds make good contact rather than sit on a hard-packed surface. Aerifying the lawn before overseeding loosens the soil and creates an excellent surface for planting. Fertilize with standard lawn fertilizer or one formulated specifically for use when planting grass seed. Then water lightly as often as needed to keep the soil moist. Water more heavily and less frequently as the young grasses grow. Mow the areas that are overseeded when existing grasses grow too tall. Most important, do not use any form of herbicide in these areas until next year, including fertilizer/herbicide combinations.

WEEDS CRABGRASS

An abundance of crabgrass has been one of this year’s most common complaints. The repeated heavy spring rains interfered with pre-emergence herbicides. So even lawns that were treated for crabgrass may have lots of it.

Because crabgrass is an annual weed that dies over the winter, there’s no point in using weed killers on it now. Instead, plan to apply a pre-emergence herbicide to infested areas next spring.

Natural products containing corn gluten meal also prevent crabgrass, but they take several years of spring and late-summer applications to be the most effective.

PERENNIAL WEEDS

 

Creeping Charlie Herbicide

Ortho herbicide for creeping charlie

By the latter part of September, temperatures will have cooled enough to begin using broad-leaf herbicides on dandelions, plantain, creeping Charlie and other perennial weeds, which spring back from the same roots year after year.Because perennial weeds are storing nutrients in their roots now for next year’s growth, they’ll take in herbicide more readily in the fall. On really tough weeds such as creeping Charlie, you can add a second herbicide application two weeks after the first.

If you prefer not to use herbicides, manually dig out perennial weeds. And remember, the weeds you remove this fall won’t be around to produce seeds next year.

AERATE AND DETHATCH

If your soil is hard or you have a thick buildup of thatch (more than 1/2 inch), your lawn will benefit from core aeration in September. Aeration takes small plugs out of the soil, which allows water, fertilizer and oxygen to penetrate below the surface and encourages good grass growth. (The small cores of soil should be left on the surface of the grass, so they break down and top-dress the soil.) You can rent an aeration machine (it’s hard work) or hire the job out.

Power rake

If the thatch is really thick, rent a dethatching machine, also known as a “vertical mower.” (Again, this is hard work you may wish to hire out.) The machine slices through the grass, bringing up lots of thatch, which will have to be raked up and added to your compost pile.

Aerating and dethatching may be done on the same day, but they will dry the soil rapidly, so be sure to water the lawn once you’re done.

Deb Brown is a garden writer and former extension horticulturist with the University of Minnesota.

via It’s prime lawn care time | StarTribune.com.

Other posts that you may enjoy:

 https://levahnbros.wordpress.com/2009/10/02/fall-yard-care/

https://levahnbros.wordpress.com/2009/05/08/grass-seed/

https://levahnbros.wordpress.com/2009/04/14/spring-lawn-care-thatch-aeration-and-fertilizers/

Lawn dethatching | Lawn gardening | Home lawn care: Gardening.

https://levahnbros.wordpress.com/2012/08/31/lawn-dethatching-lawn-gardening-home-lawn-care-gardening/

https://levahnbros.wordpress.com/2012/09/01/when-should-you-dethatch-or-aerate-your-lawn/

LeVahn Brothers Hardware is located at 12700 Bass Lake Rd. Maple Grove, MN 55369

Find us online at levahnbros.com and also on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/levahnbrothers

You can aslo call us at 763-553-1222

 

Is Your Lawn Fertilizer Killing Your Trees?


 

Tree Damage on a Norway spruce

Last year there was an outbreak of dying spruce trees in the upper mid-west. It appears that the culprit is a new herbicide that is being used mostly by commercial lawn care services called Imprelis. Imprelis is manufactured by Dupont Inc. (Here’s a  link to Dupont’s Imprelis damage claims webpage)  It does a fantastic job of killing dandelions and other broadleaf weeds as well as other hard to kill weeds such as creeping charlie. However, there was an unfortunate side effect in which trees were also absorbing the weed killer and  for some varieties of trees it was doing severe damage to the tree. The trees that seem to be affected the most are Norway spruce and white pine trees. Other varieties of conifers are also effected as well. There are tell tale signs of injury that include twisting of new growth shoots and browning of needles especially towards the tops of the affected trees. The pictures above  and below are taken from the University of Minnesota Extension’s web page.

Imprelis Damage: Twisting Shoots

If you have damage to a tree there isn’t much you can do. The only advice given at this point is to make sure the patient is as comfortable as possible and keep the tree from any additional stress. Because of the browning needles the first instinct of many home owner is to assume that the tree needs water. This can lead to over-watering and cause additional stress leading to additional damage to the tree. Water the tree when it’s dry but make sure not to over-water.  Dupont also suggests avoiding fertilizing the tree for at least one year. Be sure not to compost or spread grass clippings treated with Imprelis anywhere that they could do harm to additional trees.  Lastly, you should contact your lawn care company and ask them what they are using for fertilizer and report to them the suspected damage.  Unfortunately, it appears that at this point it is a wait and see approach. Trees may be able to correct the damage themselves or they may suffer long-term effects from the damage or even die.

At this point it does not appear that there is any link to the harm of the trees and fertilizer (like Scotts) sold at retail stores. You may also want to consider using a more natural fertilizer that is less chemically based. You can also help your lawn naturally by not bagging your grass clippings. By leaving the clippings on the lawn the decaying clippings will naturally feed nutrients back into the lawn. Everything I’ve read so far states that Imprelis is only found in commercial herbicides. You can still use granular or liquid fertilizers and herbicides found at retail outlets such as our hardware store in Maple Grove.

Additional helpful links for more information about Imprelis:

Minnesota Department of Agriculture

Dupont’s page for care of stressed trees treated with Imprelis

Michigan State Extension’s page for A homeowner’s guide to Imprelis herbicide injury to landscape tree

University Of Minnesota Extensions page for Imprelis:

New Turfgrass Herbicide Linked to Injury on Some Spruces, Pines and Other Landscape Plants : Yard and Garden News : University of Minnesota Extension.

LeVahn Bros Hardware and Plumbing can be found in the Bass Lake Shopping Center at 12700 Bass Lake Rd. in Maple Grove, Minnesota

For more information we can be contacted at 763-553-1222

We can be found online at levahnbros.com and on Facebook as well at http://www.facebook.com/levahnbrothers

Appliance Parts Now Available Through LeVahn Bros. INC


Order parts online

LeVahn Brothers Plumbing and Hardware in Maple Grove is proud to announce the availability of parts for appliance, home electronics, outdoor equipment, barbecue, and hearth parts. Contact us or go straight to the website by clicking this link: Partscription. We now have over 8 million parts available to us that cover hundreds of makes and models.

For more Information contact us at 763-553-1222

Stop in and see us at 12700 Bass Lake Road Maple Grove, Mn 55369

Find us on the web at levahnbros.com and at http://www.facebook.com/levahnbrothers

We have appliance parts available to us for the following manufacturers:

A Acros, Admiral, Alliance, Amana, Arkla, Avanti

B- Bertazzoni, Bissel, Bosch, Broan Nutone, Broil King

C Cadet, Caloric, Char-Broil, Comfort Aire, Conquest, Coolerator, Cornelious, Crosley, Crystal Tips

D Dacor, Dormont, Ducane, Dundas-Jafine, Dynasty

E Electrolux, Elenco, Embraco, Estate, Ez-Flo

F Fiesta, Fisher & Paykel, Fridiaire

G Gaffers & Sattler, Gaggenau, General, General Electric, Gibson, Glenwood, Grand, Greenwald Industries

H Haier, Hampton Bay, Hardwick, Holiday, Hoover, Hot Point, Huebsch

I International

J Jade, Jenn-Air, Jordan, Julien

K Kelvinator, Kenmore, Kirkland, KitchenAid, Koblenz

L

M Magic Chef, Maytag, Menu, Master, Modern, Maid, Monogram

N Napoleon, Norcold, NuTone

O OKeefe & Merritt

P Philco

Q

R Rainfresh, RCA, Revco, Robinair, Roper, Royal

S Samsung, Shepherd, Siemens, Speed Queen, Speedqueen, Sterling, Sub Zero, Sunbeam, Sunray

T Tappan, Thermador, Thermos

U Universal

V Vermont Casting, Vesta

W Waste King, Weber, Welbilt, West Bend, WhirlPool, White Westinghouse, Wilshire, Wolf

XYZ

We have home electronics parts available for the following manufactures:

A- ADC, Advent, Acer, Aiphone, AIM, Aiwa, Akai, Akro-Mils, Alpine, Altec Lansing, Ambico, Antenna Craft, APC, Apex Digital, Apple, Audiovox

B- B & K, Bazooka, Belden, Bogen, Bosch, Bose, Boston, Brady, Broksonic, Brother, Bussman, ButtKicker

C- Cambridge, Canare, Cannon, Casio, Channel Master, Chemtronics, Chipquick, Clarion, Compaq, Computer, Connex, Crescent Tools

D- Daewoo, Delkin, Devices, Dell, Denon Electronics, Discwasher, Duracell

E Eazypower, Eclipse tools, Edsyn, E-Machine, Emerson, energizer, Epson, Eveready

F- Fisher, Fluke, Fuji, Funai

G- GC, Gateway, General Electric, Goldstar

H- Hakko, Harman/Kardon, HiCapacity, Hisense, Hitachi, Howard Sams, Hewlett Packard

I- IBM, Ideal, Infinity, InFocus, Insignia

J- JBL, Jensen, JTT, JVC

K- Kenwood, Kester, Kings, Kodak, Konica, Minolta

L- LeadeKossr, Lexmark, LG, Linksys, Lufkin Tools, Luxo

M- Madison Cable, MagLite, Magnavox, Master, Maxent, Metro/DataVac, Middle Atlantic,  Miracle Remote, Monster Cable, Motorola, Mueller, Multicore

N- NEC, Neutrik, Nite-Ize, NTE

O- Okidata, Olympus, Onkyo, Orion

P- Paladin Tools, Pan, Pacific, Panasonic  Panavise, Panduit, Philip, Philmore, Pioneer, Platt Luggage, Polaroid, Products/Datatel  Progressive Electronics

Proscan, Protek, Proview, Polk Audio

Q- Quasar, Quest Technology

R- Radio Design Labs, Razor, RCA, Recoton, RTS

S- Samsung, Sanyo/Fisher, Sector, Sencore, Sennheiser, Sharp, Shure, SimpleTech, Sony Parts & Accessories, Sony Pro Audio, Sony Recording Media, Switchcraft

T- Tech Spray, Techwood, Technics, Telex, Test-Um Inc, Toshiba, Thomson Exact Semiconductors, Toshiba America Imaging Systems, TPI, Tripplite

U- Ungar

V- Velleman, VeriFone, VDC, Video Mount Products, ViewSonic, Viore, Vivitek, Vizio

W- Wavetek, Weller, Wiha, Winegard

XYZ-  XCelite, Yamaha, Zenith

We  have Lawn & Garden equipment parts available for the following manufacturers:

A- Agri-Fab, Aircap, Atlas,  AutoSock, AYP/EHP/Electrolux

B- Bobcat/Bunton/Ryan, Briggs & Stratton, Brown Manufacturing

C- Champion, Classen

D- Dana (Foote)

E- ESA, Engine Service Association, E3

F- 

G- Gardenway, General Power, Generac

H- Honda Engines, Husqvarna, Hydro Gear, Hy-Pro

I- 

J-

K- Kohler

L- Little Wonder

M- Mantis, Maruyama, McCulloch, MTD/Yardman, Murray

N- N2, NGK, Noma

O- Oregon, OEP Parts

P- Peerless, Poulan, Poulan, Pro

Q- 

R- Robin Subaru, Ryobi (IDC)

S- SnowSport, Stanley, Swisher

T- Tecumseh, Thermoid, Troy-Bilt

U- Walbro

V-

W- Weedeater, Windsor, Whit

XYZ-

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